Tag: Giro d’Italia

Gösta Pettersson

PHOTOS

A BRIEF HISTORY

Gösta Artur Roland Pettersson (born 23 November 1940) is a retired Swedish cyclist. As an amateur, he competed in the individual and team road events at the 1960, 1964 and 1968 Olympics and won one silver and two bronze medals, in 1964 and 1968. In 1968 he also took part in two track events: individual and team 4000 m pursuit.

Pettersson’s brothers, Erik, Sture and Tomas, were also Olympic cyclists, and their quartet was known as the Fåglum brothers. They won the World Amateur Cycling Championships in 1967–1969 and a team silver medal at the 1968 Summer Olympics; three of the brothers were also part of the bronze-winning road team at the 1964 Games. In 1967 they were awarded the Svenska Dagbladet Gold Medal.

After the 1969 World Championships the Fåglum brothers turned professional. In 1970 Gösta won the Tour de Romandie, Coppa Sabatini and Trofeo Baracchi (with brother Tomas), and finished third at the Tour de France and sixth at the Giro d’Italia. Next year he won the Giro d’Italia, Giro dell’Appennino and Giro delle Marche. He finished sixth at the 1972 Giro d’Italia and seventh at the 1973 Tour de Suisse. His last major success was second place at the 1974 Tour de Suisse.

PROFESSIONAL CAREER

1970
Tour de Romandie :
Classement général
4eb étape (contre-la-montre)
Coppa Sabatini
Trophée Baracchi (avec Tomas Pettersson)
2e du Grand Prix de Lugano
2e du GP Forli
2e du GP Baden-Baden
3e du Tour de France
6e du Tour d’Italie

1971
Tour d’Italie
Tour des Apennins
Tour des Marches
2e de Paris-Nice
2e de la Semaine catalane
2e du Trophée Baracchi (avec Tomas Pettersson)
2e du Grand Prix de Lugano
2e du Tour de Sardaigne
2e du GP Baden-Baden (avec Tomas Pettersson)
3e de Milan-San Remo
3e du GP Forli

1972
7e étape du Tour d’Italie
8eb étape du Tour de Suisse
Trophée Cougnet
2e du Tour des Pouilles
3e du Trophée Baracchi (avec Tomas Pettersson)
3e du GP Forli
6e du Tour d’Italie
9e de Milan-San Remo

1973
8eb étape du Tour de Suisse (contre-la-montre)
2e du Trophée Baracchi (avec Davide Boifava)
3e du Tirreno-Adriatico
3e du Tour de Sardaigne

1974
2e du Tour de Suisse
2e du Trophée Baracchi (avec Martín Emilio Rodríguez)
Résultats sur les grands tours

Tour de France
1970 : 3e
1971 : abandon (14e étape)
Tour d’Italie
1970 : 6e
1971 : Leader du classement général Vainqueur du classement général, Jersey maillot rose pendant 4 jours
1972 : 6e, vainqueur de la 7e étape
1973 : 13e
1974 : 10e

VIDEOS


Alfonsina Strada

PHOTOS

A BRIEF HISTORY

Alfonsina Strada [Morini] (16 March 1891 – 13 September 1959) was an Italian cyclist, the only woman to have ridden one of cycling’s three major stage races. She started in the Giro d’Italia in 1924 when the organisers mistook her for a man. Newspapers called her “The Devil in a dress.” We hunted far and wide for RARE photos of this strong woman.

Her racing career included an Italian record which lasted 26 years. She died aged 69 as she propped up her motorcycle after riding to a bicycle race.

Strada’s ride in the Giro d’Italia came about through a disagreement between the organiser, Emilio Colombo of Gazzetta dello Sport, and the top riders of the day. The riders refused to take part. Colombo did what the Tour de France had done and offered places to whoever wanted to ride. Gazzetta dello Sport promised to pay their bills, their hotels and their food. It offered places for 90 riders and promised 600 chickens, 750 kg of other meat, 4,800 bananas and 720 eggs. But there would be no managers, no masseurs, no mechanics and no team cars.

Strada entered as “Strada, Alfonsin.” The absence of a final “o” or “a” to her first name hid whether she was a man or a woman. She was accepted as number 72 and, assuming her to be a man, journalists began writing of Alfonsino. The truth emerged the day before the start and by then it was too late.

She came 74th on the first day, an hour behind the leader but nothing by the standard of the day, when riders could be separated by hours. She finished 50th of 65 between Genoa and Florence and survived as far as Naples. Then the weather turned. A gale blew, rain poured, mud and rocks swept across the road. Strada was among many who crashed. Her handlebars snapped and she stood by the roadside until a peasant snapped a broomstick to jam in the hole. She rode on with one side of her bars of steel and the other of broomstick but finished outside the time limit.

The next day was to Fiume, where a crowd lifted her from her bicycle and carried her in triumph when she finished in tears from pain and exhaustion 25 minutes after the time limit. It motivated her to continue to Milan. Only 38 completed the race and Strada, although no longer formally in the running, finished more than 20 hours ahead of Telesforo Benaglia, the lanterne rouge. She finished 28 hours behind the winner, 30-year-old Giuseppe Enrici of Piedmont. But almost an hour separated Enrici from his runner-up, Federico Gay, so it was hardly a close-run race. And two riders finished behind her.

Strada was never allowed to ride the Giro again, but she followed it for several years and earned the respect of Armando Cougnet (journalist), Giardini, Colombo, Cattaneo, Lattuarda, Costante Girardengo, as well as of journalists and competitors. She rode exhibition races throughout Italy, Spain, France, Luxembourg and before Tsar Nicholas II of Russia in Saint Peterburg. In 1937, in Paris, she defeated the French champion, Robin.

In 1938 she set the female world record for the hour, covering 32.58 km at Longchamp, Paris, a record beaten in 1955 by Tamara Novikova of the Soviet Union.

The Italian writer Dino Buzzati wrote that, as a boy riding in a park in Milan, he saw Strada and managed to stay with her for two laps before “exploding”. He said that after that she shot off down the path like an arrow.

VIDEO

Italian Play dedicated to the story of Alfonsina Strada’s ride in the 1924 Giro d’Italia

Video in Italian – The first WOMAN in history to challenge the greats of cycling by cycling the Giro d’Italia: Alfonsina Strada

Bernard Hinault

PHOTOS

A BRIEF HISTORY

“As long as I breathe, I attack.” — Bernard Hinault

Bernard Hinault, born 14 November 1954 in Yffiniac, Brittany, France is a former French cyclist counted among the best cyclists of all times. A five-time winner of the prestigious Tour de France, he is also one of the only six cyclists to have won all three Grand Tours: Tour de France, Giro d’Italia and Vuelta a España. A dedicated professional to the core, he dominated the sport of cycling for a major portion of the 1970s and 1980s, and remains the last Frenchman to win the Tour de France. A charismatic personality, he was famous for his leadership skills and utter dedication to his profession. When Hinault made his professional debut in 1974, the Belgian cyclist Eddy Merckx—considered to be the greatest pro-cyclist of his time—was at the peak of his career. The year proved to be a very exciting one for cycling enthusiasts as the current superstar of the game was soon overshadowed by an emerging young one. Once Hinault made his entry into professional cycling, many of the sport’s existing records were rewritten. He started displaying great character and determination while still young and went on to surpass many of Merckx’s records. Hinault eventually secured more than 200 victories in 12 years, cementing his place among the greatest pro-cyclists of all times.

PALMARES

1975

  • Promotion Pernod
  • Champion de France de poursuite
  • Circuit de la Sarthe
  • 2e de Paris-Bourges
  • 2e du Grand Prix d’Antibes
  • 3e du Grand Prix d’Isbergues
  • 7e de Paris-Nice

1976

  • Prestige Pernod
  • Champion de France de poursuite
  • Circuit de la Sarthe :
    • Classement général
    • 3ea étape (contre-la-montre)
  • Tour du Limousin :
    • Classement général
    • 1re étape
  • Tour de l’Aude :
    • Classement général
    • 1re étape
  • Tour d’Indre-et-Loire :
    • Classement général
    • 2eb étape
  • Paris-Camembert
  • 2e étape de l’Étoile des Espoirs
  • 3e du Grand Prix du Midi libre
  • 6e du championnat du monde sur route

1977

  • Prestige Pernod
  • Liège-Bastogne-Liège
  • Gand-Wevelgem
  • Critérium du Dauphiné libéré :
    • Classement général 1re et 5e étapes
  • Tour du Limousin :
    • Classement général
    • 1re étape
  • Grand Prix des Nations (contre-la-montre)
  • 2eb étape du Tour d’Indre-et-Loire
  • 2eb étape de l’Étoile des Espoirs
  • 2e du Tour d’Indre-et-Loire
  • 2e du Tour du Tarn
  • 3e de Paris-Bruxelles
  • 3e de la Route nivernaise
  • 5e de Paris-Nice
  • 8e du championnat du monde sur route

1978

  • Prestige Pernod
  • Challenge Sedis
  • Champion de France sur route
  • Tour de France :
    • Jersey yellow.svg Classement général
    • 8e (contre-la-montre), 15e et 20e (contre-la-montre) étapes
  • Tour d’Espagne :
    • Jersey yellow.svg Classement général
    • Prologue, 11eb (contre-la-montre), 12e, 14e et 18e étapes
  • Grand Prix des Nations (contre-la-montre)
  • Critérium national :
    • Classement général
    • 3e étape
  • Circuit des genêts verts
  • 2e de Paris-Nice
  • 2e d’À travers Lausanne
  • 3e du Tour de Lombardie
  • 5e du championnat du monde sur route

1979

  • Super Prestige Pernod
  • Prestige Pernod
  • Challenge Sedis
  • Tour de France :
    • Jersey yellow Classement général
    • Leader du classement par points Classement par points
    • 2e (contre-la-montre), 3e, 11e (contre-la-montre), 15e (contre-la-montre), 21e (contre-la-montre), 23e et
    • 24e étapes
  • Flèche wallonne
  • Tour de Lombardie
  • Critérium du Dauphiné libéré :
    • Classement général
    • 3e, 5eb, 6e et 7eb (contre-la-montre) étapes
  • Grand Prix des Nations (contre-la-montre)
  • Tour de l’Oise :
    • Classement général
    • Prologue
  • Circuit de l’Indre
  • 3e étape du Critérium international (contre-la-montre)
  • 3e étape du Tour de Luxembourg
  • 3eb et 4e étapes de l’Étoile des Espoirs
  • 2e du championnat de France sur route
  • 2e de Liège-Bastogne-Liège
  • 2e du Critérium international
  • 2e du Tour de Luxembourg
  • 3e du Tour du Tarn
  • 3e d’À travers Lausanne
  • 6e de Paris-Nice
  • 6e de Paris-Tours
  • 7e de Milan-San Remo
  • 8e de Gand-Wevelgem

1980

  • Jersey rainbow.svg Champion du monde sur route
  • Super Prestige Pernod
  • Prestige Pernod
  • Challenge Sedis
  • Tour d’Italie :
    • Leader du classement général Classement général
    • 14e étape
  • Liège-Bastogne-Liège
  • Tour de Romandie
  • Prologue, 4e (contre-la-montre) et 5e étapes du Tour de France
  • Circuit des genêts verts
  • 3e étape du Critérium international
  • Prologue et 3e étape du Tour de l’Aude
  • 1reb étape du Tour du Tarn
  • 1re étape du Tour du Limousin
  • 2e du championnat de France sur route
  • 3e de la Flèche wallonne
  • 4e de Paris-Roubaix
  • 5e de l’Amstel Gold Race

1981

  • Super Prestige Pernod
  • Prestige Pernod
  • Challenge Sedis
  • Tour de France :
    • Jersey yellow Classement général
    • Jersey white Classement du combiné
    • Jersey red Prix de la combativité
    • Prologue, 6e (contre-la-montre), 14e (contre-la-montre), 18e et 20e (contre-la-montre) étapes
  • Paris-Roubaix
  • Amstel Gold Race
  • Critérium du Dauphiné libéré :
    • Classement général
    • 4e, 5e, 6e et 7e étapes
    • Critérium international :
    • Classement général
    • 1re, 2e et 3e (contre-la-montre) étapes
  • 14e étape de la Coors Classic
  • 1re étape du Tour méditerranéen
  • médaille de bronze, Coupe du Monde 3e du championnat du monde sur route
  • 3e du Tour de Corse
  • 3e de la Route nivernaise
  • 3e du Grand Prix Eddy Merckx

1982

  • Super Prestige Pernod
  • Prestige Pernod
  • Challenge Sedis
  • Tour de France :
    • Jersey yellow Classement général
    • Jersey white Classement du combiné
    • Prologue, 14e (contre-la-montre), 19e (contre-la-montre) et 21e étapes
  • Tour d’Italie :
    • Leader du classement général Classement général
    • Prologue (contre-la-montre par équipes), 3e (contre-la-montre), 18e et 22e (contre-la-montre) étapes
  • Tour de Luxembourg :
    • Classement général
    • 2e étape
  • Tour de Corse :
    • Classement général
    • 3e étape
  • Tour d’Armorique :
    • Classement général
    • Prologue
  • 4eb étape du Tour de Romandie (contre-la-montre)
  • Grand Prix des Nations (contre-la-montre)
  • Grand Prix d’ouverture La Marseillaise
  • 3e du Tour de l’Aude
  • 4e du Tour de Romandie
  • 9e de Paris-Roubaix

1983

  • Tour d’Espagne :
    • Jersey yellow Classement général
    • 15eb (contre-la-montre) et 17e étapes
  • Flèche wallonne
  • Grand Prix Pino Cerami
  • 3e étape du Tour Midi-Pyrénées

1984

  • Prestige Pernod
  • Tour de Lombardie
  • Grand Prix des Nations (contre-la-montre)
  • Trophée Baracchi (avec Francesco Moser)
  • Quatre jours de Dunkerque
  • Tour de France :
    • Jersey red Prix de la combativité
    • Prologue
    • 5e étape du Tour de la Communauté valencienne
    • 2e du Tour de France
  • 2e du Critérium du Dauphiné libéré
  • 3e de Paris-Nice
  • 4e du Championnat de Zurich

1985

  • Tour de France :
    • Jersey yellow Classement général
    • Prologue, 3e (contre-la-montre par équipes) et 8e (contre-la-montre) étapes
  • Tour d’Italie :
    • Leader du classement général Classement général
    • 12e étape (contre-la-montre)
  • 4e et 12e étapes du Coors Classic

1986

  • Coors Classic :
    • Classement général
    • 9e et 14e étapes
  • Trophée Luis Puig
  • Tour de la Communauté valencienne
  • Tour de France :
    • Leader du classement de la montagne Classement de la montagne
    • Jersey red number.svg Prix de la combativité
    • 9e (contre-la-montre), 18e et 20e (contre-la-montre) étapes
  • 2e étape du Tour Midi-Pyrénées
  • Prologue des Quatre jours de Dunkerque
  • 7e étape du Clásico RCN
  • 2e du Tour de France

PROFESSIONAL TEAMS

  • 1974 : Sonolor-Gitane
  • 1975-1977 : Gitane-Campagnolo
  • 1978-1980 : Renault-Gitane
  • 1981-1983 : Renault-Elf
  • 1984-1986 : La Vie claire

VIDEOS

Paris-Roubaix 81 : Bernard Hinault

1985 Tour de France – Bernard Hinault Crash that breaks his nose

La chute de Bernard Hinault dans le Dauphiné 1977.

Raymond Poulidor

PHOTOS

A BRIEF HISTORY

Raymond Poulidor (born April 15, 1936) was a rider of fabulous physical gifts with wins in such prestigious races as Milan-San Remo, Flèche Wallonne, Grand Prix des Nations, Vuelta a España and Paris-Nice. He started the Tour de France 14 times and finished 12 times. Despite his three second places and five thirds, he never spent a single day in Yellow. Not one. His career is littered with many tactical failures.

He had the misfortune to have his career intersect two of the postwar era’s finest riders, Jacques Anquetil and Eddy Merckx. Anquetil, wanting to be France’s premier rider so that he could command high appearance fees, was obsessed with beating Poulidor. Yet, Poulidor, “the Eternal Second”, probably made more money than Anquetil. The seemingly ambitionless Poulidor was was much more loved by the French racing fans.

Even towards the end of his career, he was still a formidable rider. When Eddy Merckx attacked descending Mount Royal near the end of the 1974 Montreal World Road Championships, only Poulidor could escape with the Belgian. Poulidor held on and finished two seconds behind Merckx for second place. In 1976, 40 years old, he was third in the Tour de France.

He had a long professional career (1960 – 1977), always riding for bike maker Mercier.

MAJOR VICTORIES

1961: Milano-San Remo, French Championships
1963: Flèche Wallonne, Grand Prix de Nations
1964: Vuelta a España, Critérium National
1966: Critérium National, Critérium du Dauphiné Libéré
1968: Critérium National
1969: Critérium du Dauphiné Libéré
1971: Catalonian Week, Critérium National
1972: Paris-Nice, Critérium National, Critérium des As
1973: Paris-Nice, G.P du Midi Libre

PROFESSIONAL TEAMS

1960 – 1969: Mercier-BP-Hutchinson
1970 – 1971: Fagor-Mercier
1972 – 1976: Gan-Mercier
1977: Miko-Mercier-Hutchinson

Original article from bikeraceinfo.com

VIDEOS



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